Available courses

Benjamin Franklin Butler: Lowell lawyer, pre-war Democrat, General in the Massachusetts Militia, military governor of Louisiana, Radical Republican, co-sponsor of the Civil Rights Act of 1875, leader of the prosecution of Andrew Jackson for his violation of the Tenure of Office Act. Vilified by the slavocracy for his military governorship of Louisiana, Butler played a significant role in the war and, despite his relatively conservative pre-war politics, advanced and increasingly radical agenda. While commanding a fortress in Virginia he was the first to designate slaves under the control of the Confederacy as contraband of war, and thus legally subject to confiscation, and de facto emancipation, by Union forces. As military governor of Louisiana he hanged a man for pulling down the U.S. flag after it was raised by Union forces, promulgated order No. 28 holding any "women (calling themselves ladies) of New Orleans"  who "shall by word, gesture, or movement insult or show contempt for any officer or soldier of the United States...held liable to be treated as a woman of the town plying her avocation." Butler's military activities met with less success than his political ones; on multiple occasions his leadership proved inept, and he was ultimately removed from command by General Grant. In 1866 Butler was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Massachusetts on a platform of civil rights for freedmen, women's suffrage, an eight hour work day, and the greenback. He led the, ultimately unsuccessful, prosecution of Andrew Jackson.

In this course we will examine the fascinating life of Benjamin Franklin Butler and explore his impact on the U.S.

This course will allow students to appreciate the need for different programiing languages and program translation. Students will develop the ability to implement solutions to problems using a programming language.

This course provides students with the ability to understand the problem solving process, appreciate the role and importance of algorithms in this process and to develop algorithms to solve the problem.

The course allows students to understand the workings of the components of a computer-based system. The student also develops an appreciation of the functional components of the computer system, including the characteristic performance and interactions.

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Intro to Mandarin Chinese

learn how to program java beyond your imaginations.

We live in a global age when events beyond our borders significantly affect our lives. Sharpen your understanding of international developments, including wars, economic globalization, wealth and poverty, the spread of democracy, environmental degradation, and global pandemics. This course offers an introduction to the study of world affairs that gives you the conceptual tools to deepen your understanding of how major historical and current trends in the world affect your life and that of others around the globe. Readings include historical documents, classic texts in the study of international relations, and current perspectives on the state of the world from multiple disciplinary perspectives. NOTE: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under GenEd and International Studies (IS) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: History 0866, GUS 0866 or POLS 0966.

USE THIS COURSE ONLY FOR GRADE PASSBACK FOR MULTIPLE ASSIGNMENTS PER COURSE.  MUST SETUP HIDDEN MOODLE ASSIGNMENTS WITH "TASKSTREAM" LABEL TO STORE THE GRADES THAT WILL BE SENT FROM THE TASKSTREAM END.

TO HANDLE GRADE PASSBACK TO SINGLE ASSIGNMENT PER COURSE, USE ENG 121 COURSE INSTEAD.

USE THIS COURSE ONLY FOR GRADE PASSBACK TO ONE ASSIGNMENT PER COURSE.  TO HANDLE GRADE PASSBACK FOR MULTIPLE ASSIGNMENTS PER COURSE, USE ENG 314 COURSE INSTEAD.

This course constitutes a broad introduction to Shakespeare's dramatic works from a variety of thematic, historical, formal, and/or generic vantages. Approaches taken to the plays will vary from class to class, but may include a chronological introduction to the development of Shakespeare's plays, a consideration of a principal Shakespearean theme or themes through a number of plays from across Shakespeare's career, a consideration of Shakespeare's protagonists through a number of plays from across Shakespeare's career, or a consideration of a number of Shakespeare's plays in historical context. Time allotted for the discussion of each play will vary, but students should expect to read, on average, a play a week. This class will prepare students for advanced courses in early modern literatures as well as other academic courses that engage in the verbal and written analysis of complex written texts. Students will be evaluated by means of essays written in and out of class, essay exams, term-long reading journals, and class participation. Students should expect to complete a minimum of three written assignments in the course of the term. The course is a basic introduction to Shakespeare's works suited for non-majors, but may be used as English major elective credit or as credit toward the English minor.

Love and political ambition and violence and evil and laughter and wit and racial antagonism and the battle between the sexes and the joy and misery of being human - Shakespeare's plays are about all of that. Discover how they work in film and video. Learn to read films and understand what actors, directors, composers, set designers, cinematographers, etc. do to bring the bard's plays to life. We will view Merchant of Venice, Richard III, Othello, Much Ado about Nothing, and Romeo and Juliet and study how these plays got from the page to the screen. We will look at actors of the present day - Pacino, McKellen, Hopkins, Hoskins, Fishburne, Branagh, Thompson, DiCaprio, Danes, etc. and also at giants of the past, like Laurence Olivier, to see how actors create their roles. This course includes group work in reviewing film techniques, innovative writing instruction, and an introduction to research. You will have access to whole plays and to selected clips streamed to your computer. NOTE: This course fulfills the Arts (GA) requirement for students under GenEd and Arts (AR) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed English 0922.